DIY Ironing Board Recovered

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There is nothing better than a new ironing board cover so I decided to recover my DIY ironing board. Maybe I should do this at the beginning of every new year!

I decided it was time to recover my ironing table. Builder Bob cut a plywood board that I could cover with batting a long time ago. In fact, over the years he has made several quilt ironing boards for me.

Recovering the ironing board

My ironing board is 29-inches by 52-inches and fits nicely on top of my shelves. The fabric was scorched and discolored so I threw it away but the batting was still fine and didn’t have to be replaced.

Use Duct Tape

I like to use duct tape to attach my batting and fabric to the plywood board. It makes it easy to recover the board. I used to staple the fabric to the board but not anymore as this is so much easier to do.

Luckily I have my big cutting table back. I laid out the fabric on it, placed the batting covered plywood on it and then pulled the fabric to the back and taped it down.

New ironing board cover

You have to admit that it looks a lot better than my old one, it was getting pretty tacky looking.

Old ironing board cover

The real reason I decided to recover my ironing board yesterday was because I had bought some new flannel tablecloths to use as design walls and wanted to put one up behind my ironing board.

The other day I was working on a baby quilt using the X Spot blocks and realized my back was getting sore because I was hunched over. The was a perfect time to raise it.

I had three stacking drawers that will work for now. The height is just a bit too tall but much better than being too short. Builder Bob helped me put it on the bins as I put duct tape on top of the drawers and only wanted to place the board on top of them once.

Someone always asks about my Algot storage system, I don’t think they are available anymore.

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Closeup of ironing board setup

Flannel Tablecloths for Design Wall

I used to have a sliding design wall at the river house but I don’t think I will have one here and I’m not ready for a permanent design wall. I have a habit of moving everything around in my quilt studio and I am sure I’ll continue doing it here.

I wanted a new white flannel backed tablecloth but didn’t want to go to the cities so I ordered some online. I ended up buying a package of five that are each 54 x 108 inches and I will probably cut a couple up to fit different walls in my studio.

Whenever you buy a flannel backed tablecloth it will have folds and possibly be wrinkled. I also throw one in the dryer with a damp cloth for a couple minutes. It will be limp at first, the wrinkles will be gone and it will feel normal in a minute or two.

I was able to use push pins to attach it to my wall. They are supposed to be heavy-duty, the flannel isn’t very thick but all of my quilt blocks are sticking to it so I’m happy.

Flannel tablecloth

Add another design wall

I think I’ll throw another one in the dryer and make another design wall area. See that clock on the wall? I think I’ll move it and continue my design wall. I love adding orphan blocks to my wall. The splash of color everywhere makes me happy and might also encourage me to make them into quilt projects!

Newly covered ironing board

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10 Comments

  1. Great ideas. Thank so much. My home-made ironing board is 24 x 52. I purchased a metal bookcase with shelves from Sam’s Club. I use plastic covered containers on shelves to hold materials, etc. It is just the right height for cutting and ironing, etc. Makes ironing quilts a dream. Covered with batten and regular ironing board cloth. I draped an old sheet over to protect the material and move and cut out old brunt sections as needed. Wish I had know about using duct tape. Clever!! I stapled material to the board. But, yours have wheels!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1. Sounds like you have a great home-made ironing board too! There are wheels on the bins but my ironing board doesn’t get moved around.

  2. Great ideas. Thank so much. My home-made ironing board is 24 x 52. I purchased a metal book case with shelves from Sam’s Club. I use plastic covered containers on shelves to hold materials, etc. It is just the right height for cutting and ironing, etc. Makes ironing quilts a dream. Covered with batten and regular ironing board cloth. I draped an old sheet over to protect the material and move and cut out old brunt sections as needed. Wish I had know about using duct tape. Clever!! I stapled material to the board. But, yours have wheels!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. I still use my old ironing board and I love getting a new cover for it. In the past I would even sew my own covers. Love your studio coming together. Using flannel backed table cloths is a great idea for your design walls. Love your gorgeous blocks being displayed and wonderful inspiration.

  4. Hi Connie:
    Thanks for the idea of using duct tape to hold the fabric on the plywood. Much simpler when it comes time to take it off. Much easier then staples.
    I really like the little quilt on the design wall. Love colour it seems to give me energy.
    Enjoy your design wall and ironing board. Good luck to Builder Bob at getting the skylights installed.
    We are lucky to have things we enjoy doing.
    All the best to everyone.
    Shirley

  5. Heather Westgard says:

    I would like to make a comment on your choice of flooring. I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE it. It is so refreshing to look at it. I wish I had the space that you have so I could have all my sewing in one room. I live in a one bedroom condo and basically my living room is my sewing room with a chesterfield (as I tell people). My bed is where I do all my cutting and laying out of the quilts. I just put a folded piece of plywood (joined with a piano hinge) that opens up and I lay that on my double bed and then on goes 2 cutting mats. But at bedtime, I have to dismantle it all and the next day I repeat the same exercise. So you see the space in my place is at a premium, but I make it work. Oh yeah, I have my sewing machine on my kitchen table. (haha). Anyway I just wanted you to know how much I love your flooring and how you have organized your space. Sorry I kind of got carried away with commenting.

  6. The pops of color on the design wall are just perfect for inspiration. It’s getting time to redo my ironing station too. I like the idea of replacing it with the new year.

  7. Peri Kujawa says:

    Elfa makes a storage system like yours. i think they are available at the container store. i have some and they are great!

  8. Jacqueline C Wolfe says:

    When covering my ironing board, I like to use decorator fabric because I can then choose a really pretty pattern. Thanks for the hint about the ease of using duct to hold the fabric in place. Enjoy your new ‘custom made’ quilting studio, Connie.

  9. Kay Susan says:

    My DIY ironing board is 24″ by 48″ and resides on the top of a desk which has been raised in height with 6″ risers.

    My twill top cover has been designed with a bias tape casing. Nylon cording is threaded through each section. There is an open area mid-way across each long side of the board. That way I can easy adjust the shape and tightness of each half and then tie the cords in the middle. I wanted something I could remove easily for laundering.

    It is also easy to construct a liner to be placed on top of my covered DIY unit. That way, I can keep the main cover clean longer. I don’t want any spray or starch to build up so the fabric is so stiff that it could stand on its own without support. LOL That and some pretty bias tape on the liner edges just adds a touch color.

    Thank you for your clear, concise directions for the DIY board and flannel tablecloth design wall.